dayoutlast is a record of my direct engagement with mostly contemporary art, mostly Los Angelean.

As this blog has evolved since its 2010 inception, so has my perspective. What I once perceived as central within the investigation was what was central, literally, within the photographic frame that I shared here. While still an important consideration, such thinking has also given way to more peripheral considerations, ones also accompanied occasionally by text (written manifestation of thought) and the oscillations between them. What's missing here are larger unknowns surrounding issues of presentation and representation; the amount of time and space it actually takes to accomplish such first-hand observations; and the quandaries between documentation and interpretation.

Despite my attempt to communicate here with image and text what is essential in some respect about the artwork, neither representation should ever be considered a substitution for the primary viewing experience. Of course, occasionally there are exceptions.

Most of the time, these posts are merely remnants---residual fragments---from my last day out.

Saturday, September 24, 2016

Jeremy Gilbert-Rolfe "L.A." @ Louis Stern Fine Art


North, 2016
Oil on linen
44 x 32 1/2 inches





Pink Square, 2013-14
Oil on linen
50 1/2 x 50 1/2 inches






They Had a Very Pleasant Evening, 2012
Gouache on paper
30 x 12 inches


Grey Genevieve II, 1994
Oil on canvas
76 x 76 inches








Blasphemy, 1989
Oil and vinyl on linen
45 x 45 inches






Note Towards a History of the Sky, 1987
Oil on linen
38 x 38 inches



Norman Zammitt
Pole #11 & Pole #3
Each 93 x 1 1/2 inches





Norman Zammitt
Yellow Burning I, 1979-81
Acrylic on canvas
72 x 9 3/4 inches




Karl Benjamin
#4, 1972
Oil on canvas
51 x 68 inches




Richard Wilson
Sabbaths, 2015
Acrylic on canvas
44 x 44 inches


Richard Wilson
Antonelli,  2015
Acrylic on canvas
44 x 44 inches



Richard Wilson
Black Hawk, 2014
Acrylic on canvas
36 x 36 inches





Color as both a linguistic sign and a perceptual phenomena occupies both two and three-dimensional space with most of these works.  Not just a conversation about the formal history of abstraction (a fallacy about absolutism and other terms marked with a capital letter) but rather they seem more about relations/relationships both within particular works (blending/stepping (analog/digital concern about space and time currently)) as well as in between works.  These grouped artists are one possibility.  Yellow as a through-line in linguistic terms, a signifier for light itself concerning impressions, expressions, and a range of symbols, all of which oscillate yet don't quite resolve within any one of these works shown here top to bottom.  A question could be, is color an adjective or a noun?