dayoutlast is a record of my direct engagement with mostly contemporary art, mostly Los Angelean.

As this blog has evolved since its 2010 inception, so has my perspective. What I once perceived as central within the investigation was what was central, literally, within the photographic frame that I shared here. While still an important consideration, such thinking has also given way to more peripheral considerations, ones also accompanied occasionally by text (written manifestation of thought) and the oscillations between them. What's missing here are larger unknowns surrounding issues of presentation and representation; the amount of time and space it actually takes to accomplish such first-hand observations; and the quandaries between documentation and interpretation.

Despite my attempt to communicate here with image and text what is essential in some respect about the artwork, neither representation should ever be considered a substitution for the primary viewing experience. Of course, occasionally there are exceptions.

Most of the time, these posts are merely remnants---residual fragments---from my last day out.

Saturday, August 19, 2017

Cindy Bernard "Things Change, Things Stay the Same" @ Richard Telles Fine Art






Something about a security envelope of space as much as the works themselves, representations of patterns that obfuscate what's inside. Speaking of what's inside, I wasn't able to access the space. So, I was able to see what I could see from the glass door.  Who knew there would be that many variations of security envelope patterns? And how have they changed over time? Since this work was first made many years ago?

"Martel Window Project: Amy Grafano" @ Richard Telles Fine Art


As the Surrealists once did so many years ago (adorning store front displays with art and interventions to address (and shock a pedestrian public), it seems worth considering how this art installation interacts with a similar commercial built space.  Not sure what to expect from a press release (how could one (ever) entirely?), upon arrival I was disappointed to find a very difficult and inaccessible installation due mostly to lighting conditions with the obvious challenges associated with glass (glare, reflection, filtration et al).  From the content of the work, the context, and the installation shots on the website, the work seems less about anything that I just said regarding glass and art history; it's just where my head took me first.



The immediate lighting concern aside, it was interesting to think about positioning, point of view, such challenges and how a two-dimensional work would foster and reflect such notions by its lines and angles. In fact, a bullet hole in the glass that mirrored the radiating symmetry of the painting detail below could have been a nice touch... Or perhaps too transgressive or obvious...?




Once I was able to reconcile the virtual and the real image in this installation, I was somehow able to make peace with the initial difficulties with the glass as certain perspectives aligned.  



PS: Apparently, the way to see the work is at night, though no invitation nor indication is made save the gallery website's documentation offerings. See below.





The preceding four photographs appear courtesy of the Richard Telles Fine Art website.



Overall, I think the installation was more excited about a display idea though it also seemed to want more than that with such a shifting context.











Analia Saban "Folds and Faults" @ Sprueth Magers


Rise/Fall. 


PLEATED INK, STAIRCASE WITH LANDING, 2017
LASER-SCULPTED PAPER ON INK ON WOOD PANEL
162,6 X 121,9 X 5,4 CM


DRAPED CONCRETE (26.25 SQ FT), 2016
FOUR CONCRETE SLABS ON WOODEN SAWHORSE
104,8 X 487,7 X 42,9 CM

Weighted issues over a barrier. X4. (Signs of labor/construction)
A hard body slumped over a rigid support.







THREADBARE (16 STEPS), 2017
PIGMENTED INK PRINT ON ACRYLIC PAINT
16 WORKS: 153,7 X 106 CM EACH





Parts and wholes disintegrate into more frayed, parts. Frayed so... 


WOVEN SOLID AS WARP, HORIZONTAL (GRAY) #1, 2017
ACRYLIC PAINT WOVEN THROUGH LINEN CANVAS ON PANEL
202,6 X 106 X 6,4 CM

That plasticy quality of paint...unnatural. Some raise a desire to touch for verification. The plasticity...



Every time I see Saban's work, I think back to the first set of paintings that I saw at Cottage Home in 2009/2010. They were so oddly plastic. See image below.


I also think about how she introduced herself to me while viewing Doug Aitken at Regen Projects on Almont in 2009; I appreciated her direct, forward approach. Not your typical reserved boundary-observing approach even within close proximity/shared space. But why not?

After two separate past events, I return to the works in this exhibition and wonder how they connect with those earlier exchanges, particularly the paintings so odd in their marks and color. And now, I am starting to think that these Folds and Faults works, largely eschewing color save a reserved language of blacks, whites, earth tones, grays, mid tones (stylish color tones all), are easily discerned in their dialectical position and shift only slightly in value.  Thus, a material investigation of painted surface focuses more on physical process, containment, and contact.  Physical alteration seems more important than surface effect. Material investigation of delicate subjects seem to be key, in which case one can't help but reflect onto the maker as well, and all the dualisms that accompany ones sense of being.  So, maybe, despite hanging on a wall, that these are not to be thought about in terms of paint, pigment, certainly not a variety of color.  So, like Malevich perhaps as the first thought in my head, these are works to be thought about in space, like folded concrete, for example, concrete objects in an otherwise abstract condition, the present viewing space as one possibility.   

I could easily see representations of Folds and Faults as symbols for curvilinear (gradual, smooth change) and rectilinear (abrupt, hard change) and therefore by extension traditional female/male interactions and distinctions, at least visually, art-historically.  Less concerned with gender as gender obviously, it's just another example of how these works function in their dualist approach.  That said, it's worth noting that such an image as bathroom shower does suggest an intimate, interior, domestic space and also its absence. Again, another set of terms that fold and unfold through one another while breaking, or at the very least, not connecting. The break for me, as a digression, is thinking about the POV of a shower in such films as Hitchcock's, Psycho, for example.  Less clear any kind of narrative obviously, it does suggest a view onto a vulnerable place of event. It's the impending moment and anticipation, just as the anxiety of things continuously rumbling beneath the surface and occasionally emerging cataclysmically. Again, surface and substance... These paintings so static, though. Before or after the event...


PLEATED INK, BATHTUB WITH SHOWER CURTAIN, 2017
LASER-SCULPTED PAPER ON INK ON WOOD PANEL
172,7 X 137,2 X 5,4 CM

Strange pictorial. Somewhere between literal and poetic as it pertains to the subject of architectural space. 




PLEATED INK, WINDOW WITH BLINDS, 2017
LASER-SCULPTED PAPER ON INK ON WOOD PANEL
152,4 X 101,6 X 5,2 CM


Dark transmission whether I be looking outward or inward, presumably outward. 
Certainly opaque as they court door/window dialogue with works on walls, the way viewers assess space looking straight-forward while standing, but possibly sitting. Rugs? Jute? Again, the physicality of paint, surface, threshold....


FOLDED CONCRETE (ACCORDION FOLD), 2017
CONCRETE ON WALNUT PALLET
OVERALL DIMENSIONS: 33 X 127 X 94 CM






WOVEN COLLAPSIBLE GATE, EXPANDED (BLACK), 2017
ACRYLIC PAINT WOVEN THROUGH LINEN CANVAS ON PANEL
92,1 X 101,8 X 4,4 CM


Fabric. Holding things together as they want to pull apart.  


If trompe loeil confusion, then what? Photo? Print? Actual material? The collapse of material understanding... Virtual image (abstract illusion) or concrete? Pun both intended and not. A continual oscillation between the general and the specific.... Like the opening and closing of a gate....


Open/Closed. Barrier representations.  Yet another dualism...



Threadbare (16 Steps), 2017
Pigmented ink print on acrylic paint




A tendency toward entropy. Most of the works represent a move in only one direction. Incremental change in "steps". cf. titles and images. Therefore, the ones that do not represent dissolution/fragmenation but actually depict object/space further complicate any clean reading of the work. cf. Spaces that humans occupy but are not present. An outlook, and inlook, or...? Just as the exhibition itself becomes complicit, especially when and where a viewer shares common ground with work, the floor sculptures.

There is a seduction in seeing things doing what they are not supposed to do, a rebellion and therefore freedom from expectation.  So, it makes sense that we continue to question our power and control between nature (basic, organic materials and their representations) and built elements from said environment. While the surface holds intrigue, we know the interior/substance is unstable at best.  And it is this interaction between inside/out that provides such curiosity even at times when it seems that all systems are solved by availability of information and human status. 

Fiona Connor "Color Census" @ 1301PE




Broadsheet featuring Anne Truitt in the News American, 1975, #2, 2017
silkscreen and pigment on coated aluminum foil
22.25 x 14.375 inches.




Broadsheet featuring Anne Truitt in the News American, 1975, #3, 2017
silkscreen and pigment on coated aluminum foil
23.25 x 14.5 inches.



 Color Census, 6211 Warner Drive, Los Angeles, 2016-2017
digital print on photo paper, painted color samples
29.5 x 22.25 inches (framed).





Color Census, 6112 Warner Drive, Los Angeles, 2016-2017
digital print on photo paper, painted color samples
29.5 x 22.25 inches (framed).




Color Census, 6247 Warner Drive, Los Angeles, 2016-2017
digital print on photo paper, painted color samples
29.5 x 22.25 inches (framed).





Here is a good example of how a grouping of artworks confuses the desire for simplicity in media nomenclature. They are works on paper, yet reading the press release, it seems like much more than that, a socio-architectural investigation that results in prints, but somehow they seem like residue or insufficient evidence (souvenirs) of where the art really happened, which was in the exchange, the boundary challenging experience between artist and homeowner at a threshold of domesticity, literally, a doorway between public and private worlds.  Therefore, the transgression of interior/exterior spaces was met with mixed results, as might be expected.

And this issue with naming the form is likely more for commerce than for the any intrinsic value of the work in and of itself. For, the work is interesting, literally, as it puts notions of being in a kind of liminal space not just of artist and homeowner, but also of viewer as each work functions more like a readymade, which is stay some object, talisman, or artifact that leads our thinking through a series of questions. and the process of questioning is probably its strongest point, what was left unsaid.

What I also think is worth considering is how this project, according to the title, solicits some kind of color inventory.  Because the work investigates homeowner, interior color choices (choices not uncontrollable givens), it suggests a focus not only of what's in the inside in relation to how things appear from the curb, but also how that functions in a very specific part of town. However, it's not clear the purpose of the latter. What exactly is at stake here representationally/symbolically?  If arbitrary, I am less interested. If intentional, I need to know more, and nothing of the work nor the press release intimates such intent.  The only thing I get here that indicates intent is a description about "portraits of homes" in a particular place.  Is there a deeper history to be understood by these homes or is it enough to be confused how a facade can also be considered a "portrait?" Oh, wait, I think I may have just answered my own question.

So, what I am left with our pithy phrases like "what's black and white and read all over" and "best not to judge a book by its cover" or " it's not what's on the outside, but what's on the inside."  In whatever version you align, I'd like to know more about what is the what.  Perhaps it's enough to contemplate what's not readily (and therefore abstractly) available up to and including history (personal, local, architectural, social, art) and its silent partner, time.

*I must also give credit where credit is due.  All of the images appear courtesy of 1301PE. For the first time in the history of this blog, I have not used my own images.  This is mostly a function of the works and their reproducibility in the gallery; I wanted better images than the ones that I took.