dayoutlast is a record of my direct engagement with mostly contemporary art, mostly Los Angelean.

As this blog has evolved since its 2010 inception, so has my perspective. What I once perceived as central within the investigation was what was central, literally, within the photographic frame that I shared here. While still an important consideration, such thinking has also given way to more peripheral considerations, ones also accompanied occasionally by text (written manifestation of thought) and the oscillations between them. What's missing here are larger unknowns surrounding issues of presentation and representation; the amount of time and space it actually takes to accomplish such first-hand observations; and the quandaries between documentation and interpretation.

Despite my attempt to communicate here with image and text what is essential in some respect about the artwork, neither representation should ever be considered a substitution for the primary viewing experience. Of course, occasionally there are exceptions.

Most of the time, these posts are merely remnants---residual fragments---from my last day out.

Saturday, December 14, 2013

Brian Wills @ Nye + Brown


Untitled, 2013
Enamel and single string rayon thread on wood
36 x 36 inches


Detail


Untitled, 2013
Single strand rayon thread on wood
(4) 12 x 96 inch panels


Oblique view


Detail


Detail


Untitled, 2013
Single strand rayon thread and basswood on wood
45 x 6 x 6 inches


Detail


Untitled,  2013
Single strand rayon thread on wood
(4) 12 x 24 inches


Oblique view


Untitled, 2013
Single strand rayon thread, basswood on wood
36 x 36 inches


At first glance, this work is seductive by its use of color and that it requires a moving body to appreciate its perceptual shifts (hence my oblique views above).  Upon further interaction, the pleasure of effect wears off for the most part, and I am left wondering if this is just an academic exercise (singles threads not weaving together to perform less than they would if they had or what other artists have already treated us to such thoughts regarding painting support inversion and thinness of ground.  When there is no title, one goes immediately to materials for attempt at meaning).  I liked the one piece that acknowledged its multidimensionality; it was the corner piece that simultaneously conjures Gene Davis and Donald Judd, albeit slight on both accounts.